Storm Events Database

Event Details

Event Thunderstorm Wind
Magnitude 53 kts.
State LOUISIANA
County/Area TENSAS
WFO JAN
Report Source Emergency Manager
NCDC Data Source CSV
Begin Date 2011-04-27 01:24:00.0 CST-6
Begin Location 1W NEWELLTON
Begin Lat/Lon 32.07/-91.24
End Date 2011-04-27 01:24:00.0 CST-6
Deaths Direct/Indirect 0/0 (fatality details below, when available...)
Injuries Direct/Indirect 0/0
Property Damage 5.00K
Crop Damage 0.00K
Episode Narrative A historic outbreak of tornadoes across the Ark-La-Miss began late on Tuesday, April 26th continuing into the early morning hours of Wednesday, April 27th. The event ramped up again during the early afternoon of April 27th continuing into the early evening. The activity on April 26th began as supercell thunderstorms producing large hail and tornadoes across northeast Texas and portions of Arkansas before evolving into a squall line as it moved east. This line of storms had multiple stages of evolution and moved across several states before dissipating. This line was very efficient in producing wind damage as it pushed east. More impressively, this line was responsible for 21 of the 32 tornadoes that occurred across the Ark-La-Miss during this event. Of those 21, 11 were rated as strong (EF2, EF3) tornadoes and had fairly long path lengths.
The atmosphere reloaded quickly Wednesday morning and became increasingly favorable for more severe storms by early afternoon. The driving force for the activity Wednesday afternoon was a potent shortwave and deep surface low that intensified during the day. The winds in the mid levels of the atmosphere increased to 80-100 mph helping to deepen the surface low further, which in turn caused the low level winds to become stronger. The wind shear caused by the turning of the winds from south near the surface to westerly aloft was at rare levels for late April over the Deep South. In addition, an abundance of low level moisture returned to the area in wake of the morning complex. Sunny skies during the morning interacted with the high levels of low level moisture eventually leading to a very unstable air mass by early afternoon. The result was an extremely rare mix of instability and wind shear. These ingredients, along with lift from a potent upper disturbance, ultimately led to the historic tornado outbreak of April 27, 2011.
By early afternoon, several discrete supercell thunderstorms were developing across central and eastern Mississippi. It did not take long for these storms to take on ���classic��� supercell structures and begin producing tornadoes. The first tornado of the afternoon started in Neshoba County on the north side of Philadelphia. This tornado ended up producing EF-5 damage and tracked for 29 miles across Neshoba, Kemper, Winston and Noxubee Counties. Through the rest of the afteroon multiple tornadoes developed, stemming from multiple supercell storms. Nearly all of the storms produced tornadoes, with many of them long track and significant. The other violent tornado to impact the Jackson, MS forecast area occurred across Smith, Jasper, and Clarke Counties. This tornado continued into Alabama and had a total path length of 124 miles across both states.
Loss of life during this historic event was staggering. 321 people lost their lives making this the second deadliest tornado outbreak in U.S. history. The March 18, 1925 Tri-State tornado outbreak is first with 747 fatalities. This marks the first EF-5 tornado in Mississippi since the Candlestick Park tornado on May 3, 1966, and this marks the first time since statistics have been kept that two EF-5 tornadoes have been recorded on the same day in Mississippi, with the tornado in Smithville also rated as EF-5. Incredibly, 4 tornadoes had path lengths over 100 miles across the southern states during this event, and all 4 of these were rated either EF-4 or EF-5.
Event Narrative A few trees and power lines were blown down.


    



All events for this episode:

Location County/Zone St. Date Time T.Z. Type Mag Dth Inj PrD CrD
Totals: 0 1 1.645M 300.00K
PT PLEASANT MOREHOUSE PAR. LA 04/26/2011 21:44 CST-6 Tornado EF0 0 0 20.00K 0.00K
SPYKER MOREHOUSE PAR. LA 04/26/2011 21:44 CST-6 Thunderstorm Wind 60 kts. EG 0 0 60.00K 0.00K
STEVENSON MOREHOUSE PAR. LA 04/26/2011 21:45 CST-6 Tornado EF1 0 1 60.00K 300.00K
OAK RIDGE MOREHOUSE PAR. LA 04/26/2011 22:40 CST-6 Thunderstorm Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 1.00K 0.00K
BEAR SKIN WEST CARROLL PAR. LA 04/26/2011 22:57 CST-6 Hail 1.00 in. 0 0 0.00K 0.00K
OAK GROVE WEST CARROLL PAR. LA 04/26/2011 23:00 CST-6 Thunderstorm Wind 55 kts. EG 0 0 15.00K 0.00K
DARNELL WEST CARROLL PAR. LA 04/26/2011 23:03 CST-6 Tornado EF2 0 0 250.00K 0.00K
BOWIE EAST CARROLL PAR. LA 04/26/2011 23:11 CST-6 Tornado EF2 0 0 400.00K 0.00K
TALLULAH MADISON PAR. LA 04/26/2011 23:40 CST-6 Thunderstorm Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 1.00K 0.00K
BASKIN FRANKLIN PAR. LA 04/27/2011 00:10 CST-6 Thunderstorm Wind 65 kts. EG 0 0 125.00K 0.00K
MER ROUGE MOREHOUSE PAR. LA 04/27/2011 00:20 CST-6 Flash Flood 0 0 2.00K 0.00K
QUEBEC MADISON PAR. LA 04/27/2011 00:33 CST-6 Thunderstorm Wind 65 kts. EG 0 0 350.00K 0.00K
WINNSBORO FRANKLIN PAR. LA 04/27/2011 00:50 CST-6 Thunderstorm Wind 68 kts. EG 0 0 280.00K 0.00K
WISNER FRANKLIN PAR. LA 04/27/2011 01:20 CST-6 Thunderstorm Wind 65 kts. EG 0 0 45.00K 0.00K
NEWELLTON TENSAS PAR. LA 04/27/2011 01:24 CST-6 Thunderstorm Wind 53 kts. EG 0 0 5.00K 0.00K
HARRISONBURG CATAHOULA PAR. LA 04/27/2011 01:30 CST-6 Thunderstorm Wind 55 kts. EG 0 0 4.00K 0.00K
QUAID CATAHOULA PAR. LA 04/27/2011 02:05 CST-6 Thunderstorm Wind 55 kts. EG 0 0 20.00K 0.00K
QUIMBY MADISON PAR. LA 04/27/2011 04:55 CST-6 Thunderstorm Wind 55 kts. EG 0 0 7.00K 0.00K
Totals: 0 1 1.645M 300.00K