Hurricanes & Tropical Storms - July 2013


NCDC transitioned to the nClimDiv dataset on Thursday, March 13, 2014. This was coincident with the release of the February 2014 monthly monitoring report. For details on this transition, please visit our public FTP site and our U.S. Climate Divisional Database site.

Note: This report catalogs recent tropical cyclones across the North Atlantic and East Pacific and places each basin's tropical cyclone activity in a climate-scale context. It is not updated in real time. Users seeking real time status and forecasts of tropical cyclones should visit The National Hurricane Center.

North Atlantic


July 2013 Tropical Cyclone Counts
Storm Type July 2013 July 1981-2010 Average Record Most for July
Period of Record: 1851-2013
Tropical Strorm
(Winds > 39 mph)
2 1.1
5
(2005)
Hurricane
(Winds > 74 mph)
0 0.4
3
(1916, 1966, 2005)
Major Hurricane
(Winds > 111 mph)
0 0.1 2
(1916, 2005)

July 2013 Individual Tropcal Cyclones
Name Dates of winds
>39 mph
Maximum
Sustained Winds
Minimum
Central Pressure
Landfall
Tropical Storm Chantal July 8th–10th 65 mph 1005 mb N/A
Tropical Storm Dorian July 24th–27th 60 mph 999 mb N/A

East Pacific


July 2013 Tropical Cyclone Counts
Storm Type July 2013 July 1981-2010 Average Record Most for July
Period of Record: 1949-2013
Tropical Strorm
(Winds > 39 mph)
3 3.6 7
(1985)
Hurricane
(Winds > 74 mph)
2 1.9
4
(1971, 1982, 1990, 1992, 2008)
Major Hurricane
(Winds > 111 mph)
0 1
3
(1978, 1985, 1992)

July 2013 Individual Tropcal Cyclones

Name Dates of winds
>39 mph
Maximum
Sustained Winds
Minimum
Central Pressure
Landfall
Hurricane Dalia June 30th–July 4th 75 mph 987 mb N/A
Hurricane Erick July 5th–9th 80 mph 984 mb N/A — Minor impacts along Mexico's Pacific coast.
Tropical Storm Flossie July 25th–30th 70 mph 995 mb N/A — Minor impacts in the Hawaiian Islands
TS Flossie
Tropical Storm Flossie Track
Source: National Weather Service

Tropical Storm Flossie developed from a broad area of low pressure southwest of Acapulco, Mexico on July 25th. The storm traversed a large portion of the eastern and central Pacific Ocean over the course of five days. The storm's intensity peaked with winds of 70 mph on the 27th over open water. The storm weakened as it approached the Hawaiian Islands, and dropped to tropical depression status off the northern coast of Maui on the 30th. Tropical Storm warnings were issued for most of the state, with the expectation of Flossie being the first tropical storm to hit the state since Hurricane Iniki in 1992. This was also the first time tropical storm warnings had been issued for Hawaii since 2007. The storm weakened drastically as it approached Hawaii due to strong wind shear. Rainfall totals generally ranged from 1 to 3 inches in many locations in the state, and contributed to an already wet month. Gusty winds, approaching 50 mph, caused most of the impacts, with downed trees and more than 10,000 homes losing power.

Citing This Report

NOAA National Climatic Data Center, State of the Climate: Hurricanes & Tropical Storms for July 2013, published online August 2013, retrieved on November 26, 2014 from http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/tropical-cyclones/2013/7.