Hurricanes & Tropical Storms - August 2007


NCDC transitioned to the nClimDiv dataset on Thursday, March 13, 2014. This was coincident with the release of the February 2014 monthly monitoring report. For details on this transition, please visit our public FTP site and our U.S. Climate Divisional Database site.


Atlantic Basin

Hurricane Dean
Hurricane Dean Satellite Image
Hurricane Dean Track
Hurricane Dean Track

Safir Simpson Color Legend for Track Map from Unisys
Saffir-Simpson Scale Color Legend

On August 13, tropical depression four formed in the eastern Atlantic ocean off the coast of Africa. This tropical depression became organized as it moved west and was upgraded to tropical storm Dean. As Dean progressed westward, it continued to intensify and was classified as the first 2007 Atlantic hurricane on August 16. The hurricane passed into the Caribbean near Martinique and Saint Lucia as a Category 2 hurricane on August 17. Dean continued to strengthen and reached Category 5 status by late on August 20, and it made landfall as a Category 5 hurricane on August 21 on the Yucatán Penninsula of Mexico near Costa Maya in a sparsely populated area. After weakening over the peninsula, Dean passed again over open water in the southwestern part of the Gulf of Mexico, enabling it to strengthen back to a Category 2 hurricane before making landfall a second time near Tecolutla on August 22. Peak intensity was 270 km/hr (146 knots or 165 mph) with a minimum pressure of 906 mb. More information on Dean is available from the NOAA National Hurricane Center.


Tropical Storm Erin
Tropical Storm Erin Satellite Image
Tropical Storm Erin Track
Tropical Storm Erin Track

Safir Simpson Color Legend for Track Map from Unisys
Saffir-Simpson Scale Color Legend

A tropical depression formed on August 14 about 425 miles (685 km) east-southeast of Brownsville, Texas and about 425 miles (680 km) east of La Pesca, Mexico. It organized enough to be classified the next day as a tropical storm and given the name Erin. Erin weakened and crossed the Texas coast near Lamar on the 16th as a tropical storm and later became extratropical. The remnants of Erin continued northwestward through Texas and turned north and tracked over the south-central U.S., causing extensive flooding in Oklahoma on August 19. Although Erin was no longer a tropical system, radar imagery on the 19th indicated a clear hole resembling an eye in the precipitation field around which the heavy rain rotated. Peak intensity was 65 km/hr (35 knots or 40 mph) with a minimum pressure of 1003 mb. More information on Erin is available from the NOAA National Hurricane Center.


Pacific Basin

Hurricane Flossie
Hurricane Flossie Satellite Image
Hurricane Flossie Track
Hurricane Flossie Track Map
Safir Simpson Color Legend for Track Map from Wikipedia
Saffir-Simpson Scale Color Legend
Flossie developed as a tropical disturbance about 600 miles (970 km) south-southeast of Acapulco on August 2. It was classified as tropical depression on the afternoon of the 8th and intensified enough to be upgraded to Tropical Storm Flossie later that day. As Flossie tracked steadily westward, it developed an eye on August 9 and was upgraded to a hurricane on the tenth. Under favorable conditions, Flossie rapidly intensified overnight and was classified as a major hurricane in the wee hours of August 11. It continued its west-northwestward track into the Central Pacific, approaching the Hawaiian Islands, and its winds reached speeds of up to 140 mph (220 km/h). It weakened slightly on the 12th and 13th due to increased vertical shear, and passed south of the Big Island of Hawaii. Flossie continued to weaken and was downgraded to a tropical depression on August 16. The minimum central pressure of Flossie was 946 mb, and the maximum sustained winds were 220 km/hr (119 knots or 137 mph). More information may be found on NCDC's 2007 Northeast Pacific Tropical Cyclone statistics page, at the NOAA National Hurricane Center, or at the NOAA Central Pacific Hurricane Center.

Tropical Storm Gil
Tropical Storm Gil Satellite Image
Tropical Storm Gil Track
Tropical Storm Gil Track Map
Safir Simpson Color Legend for Track Map from Wikipedia
Saffir-Simpson Scale Color Legend
An area of disturbed weather west of Manzanillo, Colima, Mexico, was classified as a tropical depression early on August 29, and was upgraded to Tropical Storm Gil later that afternoon. Gil was short-lived due to the unfavorable wind shear and stable environment it encountered. Tropical Storm Gil dissipated on September 2. The maximum sustained winds of Gil were 75 km/hr (40 knots or 47 mph), and the minimum pressure was 994 mb. More information may be found on NCDC's 2007 Northeast Pacific Tropical Cyclone statistics page, at the NOAA National Hurricane Center.

Citing This Report

NOAA National Climatic Data Center, State of the Climate: Hurricanes & Tropical Storms for August 2007, published online September 2007, retrieved on September 15, 2014 from http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/tropical-cyclones/2007/8.