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Correlation between Arabian Sea and Greenland climate oscillations of the past 110,000 years

Figure 2 Correlation of high-frequency climate variability 
for the past 65,000 years between  ice-core and marine-sediment-core records. Correlation between Arabian Sea and Greenland climate oscillations of the past 110,000 years
Nature Vol. 393, pp. 54 - 57, 07 May 1998

Hartmut Schulz,1 Ulrich von Rad1, Helmut Erlenkeuser,2 and Ulrich von Rad1
1 Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), PF 510153, Hannover,Germany
2 Leibniz-Labor für Altersbestimmung und Isotopenforschung, Universität Kiel, Max-Eyth-Strasse 11-13, D-24118 Kiel, Germany

Figure 2. Correlation of high-frequency climate variability for the past 65,000 years between ice-core and marine-sediment-core records. a, Greenland GISP2 d18Oice record; b and c, two high-resolution (average sample resolution ~100 yr) marine TOC-records of cores SO90-111KL and SO90-136KL off Pakistan, based on a 1:1 fit using the GISP2 chronology. Following the generalized lithology shown in d, profiles from the centre of the OMZ are characterized by conspicuous alternations between dark-coloured, distinctly to indistinctly laminated, TOC-rich (black in d) and light-coloured, bioturbated pteropod-rich and TOC-poor intervals (white in d), indicating millennial- to centennial-scale variability of monsoonal surface water productivity and bottom-water oxygenation. Numbers indicate Greenland interstadials IS1-18, and equivalent Arabian Sea monsoonal events 1-18; H1-H6 indicate northern North Atlantic Heinrich meltwater events, coinciding with the deposition of bioturbated intervals in the Arabian Sea record. YD, Younger Dryas; triangles in b and c show AMS

ABSTRACT:
Palaeoclimate studies have revealed the general high-frequency instability of Late Pleistocene climate - for example, the so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events - on timescales of a few millennia, centuries or even decades. Here we present evidence for a general relationship between low-latitude monsoonal climate variability and the rapid temperature fluctuations of high northern latitudes that are recorded in the Greenland ice records. Sediment cores from the northeastern Arabian Sea show laminated, organic-carbon-rich bands, reflecting strong monsoon-induced biological productivity, that correlate with the mild interstadial climate events in the northern North Atlantic region. In contrast, periods of lowered southwest monsoonal intensity, indicated by bioturbated, organic-carbon-poor bands, are associated with intervals of high-latitude atmospheric cooling and the injection of melt water into the North Atlantic basin. Our records suggest that Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events are strongly expressed in low-latitude (monsoonal) climate variability, suggesting the importance of common forcing agents such as atmospheric moisture and other greenhouse gases.
To read or view the full study, please visit the Science website.

DATA:
Download the Data from the WDC Paleo Archive.
Fig. 3.
Correlation of high-frequency climate variability for the past 110,000 yr between ice-core and marine-sediment-core records. a, Greenland GISP2 d18Oice record; b, the marine d18O stable-isotope record of the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber; c, the record of sonic velocity (Vp) of sediment cores SO90-88/93KL. Notation of interstadials IS1-IS24, YD, Heinrich events H1-H7 and Arabian Sea equivalent events 1-24 follows Fig. 2. Italic numbers 1-5.3 indicate standard SPECMAP17 oxygen-isotope stages. In cores 88KL and 93KL, shards derived from the Toba mega-eruption occur at 620-624 and 623-627 cm core depth, respectively, near the isotope stage 4/5 boundary, that is, between Greenland interstadials IS19 and IS20 as well as between Arabian Sea equivalents 19 and 20.

DISCUSSION:
Both the total organic carbon (TOC, Figure 2) and the stable oxygen isotope and sonic velocity (Figure 3) from the Arabian Sea cores show the broad geographic impact of the abrupt climate changes during the last glacial period. These record reveals climatic impacts in China synchronous with the North Atlantic Ocean Heinrich events as seen in ice cores from Greenland .

The Greenland Ice Sheet Project Two (GISP2) core data is also available on the WDC Paleo website.

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