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Climate of 2006


Annual Review


Significant U.S. and Global Events


National Climatic Data Center
11 January 2007
Significant U.S. Weather & Climate Events for 2006
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  • Significant Events
  • Review of U.S. Events
  • Review of Global Events
  • Global Summary
  • ENSO Conditions
  • U.S. Summary
  • U.S. Drought
  • Atlantic Hurricane Season
  • Western U.S. Wildfire Season

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    Top of Page Review of U.S. Events

    *Compiled from both NOAA and non-NOAA sources, including U.S. and international news media reports

    JAN / FEB / MAR / APR / MAY / JUN / JUL / AUG / SEP / OCT / NOV / DEC

    Top of Page January 2006

    Across the United States, significant drought amelioration continued throughout the Northwest and Rocky Mountains, while worsening drought conditions were observed in the Southern Plains and Southwest. Exceptional drought classification persisted in the Arklatex region during early January, where grass fires were also a major problem early in the month. For more detailed drought information, please see the Climate of 2006 Annual Review of U.S. Drought.

    In the United States, an outbreak of severe thunderstorms affected areas of the Ohio Valley into the Southeast on the 2nd. Hail, damaging thunderstorm winds, and several tornadoes were reported, with most of the adverse weather occurring in the states of Kentucky and Georgia.

    In the United States on the 18th, a powerful extra-tropical storm system brought heavy rains and strong winds to the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast states, with heavy snow across interior sections. Strong winds gusted to near 100 km/hr (60 mph) in the Boston and New York City metropolitan areas, causing significant travel disruptions and knocking out power to more than 440,000 homes and businesses in the region. The strong winds were blamed for two deaths (Associated Press).

    Top of Page February 2006

    In the United States, severe thunderstorms produced two tornadoes that affected the New Orleans, Louisiana area during the early morning of February 2. The tornadoes affected neighborhoods ravaged by Hurricane Katrina, tearing off roofs, knocking down utility poles and collapsing at least one Katrina-damaged house.

    A major winter snowstorm affected areas of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast during February 11-12, 2006. In New York City's Central Park, where record-keeping began in 1869, 68.3 cm (26.9 inches) of snow fell between 4 p.m. Saturday and 4 p.m. Sunday, breaking the previous all-time storm total record of 67.1 cm (26.4 inches) set during a December 26-27, 1947 storm.

    In Hartford, CT, a snowfall total of 55.6 cm (21.9 inches) broke the old storm total record of 53.3 cm (21 inches) set in 1983. There were many reports between 25-51 cm (10-20 inches).

    Top of Page March 2006

    Severe wildfires/grassfires charred more than 340,000 hectares (840,000 acres) in Texas, killing 11 people and approximately 10,000 cattle and horses (Associated Press). The biggest fires were located in the Texas Panhandle, with Gray and Hutchinson counties among the hardest-hit. Other significant fire activity was reported in Oklahoma by the 16th.

    Exceptionally heavy rain since February 2006 in Hawaii caused flooding and a dam failure in Kilauea on the 14th, forcing the release of around 1.1 million cubic meters (300 million gallons) of water. There were at least two fatalities and seven reported missing (CNN).

    Severe weather affected parts of the U.S. Southern Plains and Midwest, with over 100 reported tornadoes in 5 states from Oklahoma to Illinois during the 10th-13th. Preliminary estimates indicate 10 fatalities (AFP).

    A major winter storm affected the parts of the U.S. Great Plains during March 17-20. Heavy accumulations of snow affected a large area from parts of Colorado and Wyoming eastward into North and South Dakota and Kansas. Nebraska was particularly hard-hit, with snow accumulations of up to 76 cm (30 inches). The snow caused many travel disruptions and closed many schools and businesses (Associated Press).

    Top of Page April 2006

    In the United States, heavy rainfall across coastal and valley areas of California produced flooding during April 3-5. Streams and creeks rose out of their banks, and an earthen dam near Valley Springs threatened to rupture on the 5th, forcing the evacuation of about 100 homes (Associated Press). Heavy snow fell throughout mountainous areas. By the 13th, California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger declared nine counties a disaster area due to heavy rainfall and flooding since the beginning of the month (Associated Press). Precipitation surpluses since the 1st were more than 200 mm (8 inches) in some areas of the state.

    In the United States, a major outbreak of severe weather on the 2nd was responsible for 86 reported tornadoes across Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, Arkansas, Kentucky, Indiana and Tennessee. Northwestern Tennessee was the hardest-hit area, with 19 confirmed deaths in two counties (Dyer and Gibson). At least 23 deaths were attributed to the storms across the region (Reuters).

    Additional severe weather occurred in the Tennessee Valley on the 7th, with 91 reported tornadoes. Nine people were killed in Sumner County, TN just north of Nashville as a tornado rated F3 on the Fujita Scale tore through the county(Associated Press).

    On April 13, severe thunderstorms produced a tornado that ripped through eastern Iowa, including Iowa City and the University of Iowa campus where significant damage occurred. There was one fatality in the state (Associated Press). For a complete analysis on tornado outbreaks during March and April 2006 in the United States, please see this special report.

    Top of Page May 2006

    In the United States, pre-wet season dryness exacerbated wildfires in Florida during the first two weeks of May. Debris from fires forced a temporary closure of Interstate Highway 95 from Port Orange to Edgewater (Associated Press). In Florida, the rainy season usually starts around the beginning of June.

    In the United States, persistent and heavy rainfall during May 10-15 brought historic flooding to New England, described as the worst in 70 years in some areas. Rainfall accumulations of 300-430 mm (12 to 17 inches) caused massive river flooding and broke numerous records. Thousands of people were evacuated from their homes, and there was at least one flood-related fatality. Flooded rivers, roads and sewer systems raised concerns over the shellfish industry, as offshore shellfish beds were at risk of being polluted by the runoff from the recent heavy rainfall. Some shellfish beds were temporarily closed as a result. (Reuters/Associated Press).

    In the United States, severe thunderstorms produced tornadoes that caused three fatalities in north Texas. The deaths occurred northeast of Dallas in Collin County where 26 homes were severely damaged or destroyed. There were ten injuries from the storms that occurred on the evening of the 9th (Reuters).

    Top of Page June 2006

    Across the United States, significant drought extended from the Desert Southwest eastward through the Southern Plains. Exceptional drought classification persisted across Deep South Texas as well as southern Arizona. In the wake of Hurricane Katrina across southern Louisiana, the eight months since October 1, 2005 have been the driest in 111 years of record-keeping (Associated Press).

    In the United States, persistent heavy rainfall deposited up to 280 mm (11 inches) of rain in the greater Houston, Texas area on the 19th. Widespread flash flooding was the result in south and east sections of the city. The Houston Fire Department rescued more than 500 people from flood waters with no serious injuries or fatalities reported (Reuters).

    Across the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast, exceptionally heavy rainfall occurred during June 22-28. Rain amounts exceeded 254 mm (10 inches) in some areas, with numerous daily and monthly rainfall records set. Flooding was widespread throughout the greater Washington, DC area, northward through parts of Pennsylvania and New York. As the Susquehanna River rose above flood stage, up to 200,000 people in the Wilkes-Barre, PA area were forced to evacuate. Regionally, there were 16 deaths blamed on the flooding, along with preliminary damage estimates exceeding $100 million (USD) (CNN/Reuters).

    Tropical Storm Alberto developed as a depression in the northwestern Caribbean Sea on the 10th. The cyclone reached tropical storm strength the next day as it moved into the Gulf of Mexico. Alberto made landfall in Apalachee Bay along the Florida panhandle around midday on the 15th with maximum sustained winds near 85 km/hr (40 knots or 50 mph). The primary impacts from Alberto were heavy rainfall and flooding, with areas of western Cuba receiving as much as 305 mm (12 inches) of rain during the 10th-11th. Alberto weakened into a depression as it trekked inland through coastal sections of Georgia and the Carolinas, depositing a swath of 75-130 mm (3-5 inch) rainfall amounts along its course. River flooding resulted in affected areas of the Carolinas.

    Top of Page July 2006

    Across the United States, significant drought extended from Arizona and New Mexico eastward to parts of the central Gulf Coast. The most severely affected areas included southern Arizona, southern Texas and central South Dakota.

    A heat wave affected a large portion of the nation during July 16-25. California was particularly affected, with 140 deaths attributed to high temperatures soaring past 40°C (104°F)(New York Times/Associated Press).

    In the United States, two episodes of severe thunderstorms caused massive power outages in the greater St. Louis, Missouri area. The culprit severe weather episodes occurred on the 19th and again on the 21st, causing the largest power outage in the city's history. At the height of the power failure, 570,000 customers lost power in St. Louis (Associated Press). Exacerbating the power disruptions was a heat wave which affected much of the region. For a complete report on the storms, please see the National Weather Service report.

    Tropical Storm Beryl developed off the southeast coast of the United States on the 18th and brushed southern New England, passing over Nantucket Island during the early morning of the 21st with maximum sustained winds near 85 km/hr (45 knots or 50 mph). Winds on Nantucket gusted to 71 km/hr (44 mph).

    Top of Page August 2006

    Across the United States, significant drought affected large areas of the nation. Exceptional drought was noted across portions of South Dakota as well as sections of Texas and Oklahoma along the Red River.

    A heat wave across the northeastern quarter of the United States during the first week of August claimed 22 lives in New York. In New York City the heat index, which represents the combined effects of heat and humidity, climbed to 44°C (111°F) on the 3rd (AFP).

    In the United States, rainfall in parts of the greater El Paso, Texas area totaled more than 380 mm (15 inches) since July 27, 2006, or nearly twice the seasonal average for the city. The resulting flooding destroyed as many as 300 homes and caused an estimated $100 million (USD) in damage. One flood-related death was reported (MSNBC).

    In the United States, severe thunderstorms spawned a tornado that affected Nicollet and Le Sueur counties in Minnesota on the 24th. There was one death and several injuries, along with damage to many houses (Associated Press).

    Hurricane Ernesto developed in the eastern Caribbean Sea as a depression on the 24th and attained tropical storm status the next day. Ernesto became a hurricane just before crossing the western tip of Haiti on the 27th. The storm was blamed for 4 deaths on Haiti (OCHA). Ernesto then tracked across the western half of Cuba before emerging over the Florida Straits as a tropical storm on the 29th. The storm moved across the Florida peninsula, briefly weakening into a tropical depression before re-strengthening to tropical storm status as it emerged off the southeast coast of the United States on the 31st.

    Top of Page September 2006

    In the United States, severe thunderstorms produced tornadoes and flooding across portions of the Midwest and South on the 22nd. Damage from the storms was reported in Missouri, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and Tennessee. In central and eastern Missouri, nearly 400 structures were damaged or destroyed and at least 10 people were injured by 10 tornadoes. Regionally, 13 deaths were attributed to the severe weather (Associated Press).

    Tropical Storm Ernesto developed during the month of August but made landfall along the North Carolina coast near Long Beach just before midnight on September 1st with maximum sustained winds near 115 km/hr (60 knots or 70 mph). The primary impact from Ernesto was heavy rainfall along its course. Parts of eastern North Carolina and Virginia received 200-300 mm (8-12 inches of rainfall). Estimated crop losses were $59 million (USD) in North Carolina, while total lost were near $90 million (USD) in Virginia (Associated Press).

    Top of Page October 2006

    Heavy rainfall in parts of southern Alaska totaled 75-125 mm (3 to 5 inches) during the 8th-12th. Subsequent flooding and mudslides washed out sections of the Richardson Highway, closing a 106-km (66-mile) stretch of highway north of Valdez (Associated Press).

    In the United States, the season's first blast of cold air affected areas of the Upper Midwest and Great Lakes. In addition to subfreezing temperatures across a large area, snowfall was also common throughout the region.

    The unseasonably cold air traversing the relatively warm waters of the Great Lakes generated significant lake effect snowfall during October 12-13. In western New York, record October snowfall occurred in Buffalo, with 57.4 cm (22.6 inches) recorded at the airport. This broke the monthly record for a single snowfall event, and also was the 6th heaviest snowfall on record. Nearly one million people lost power during the event. For a complete synopsis of the event, see the National Weather Service report.

    Heavy snow and strong winds created blizzard conditions in parts of Colorado on the 26th. Parts of the Rockies received as much as 46 cm (18 inches) of snow (Associated Press).

    Top of Page November 2006

    Across the United States, significant drought affected areas of the Plains and Rocky Mountains. Extreme drought was also concentrated in northern areas of Minnesota, parts of Wyoming and Nebraska, as well as sections of Texas and Oklahoma.

    Heavy rainfall in the U.S. Pacific Northwest brought flooding to sections of Washington and Oregon, prompting evacuations and resulting in at least three deaths (Associated Press). A NOAA/U.S. Climate Reference Network site in the Olympic National Park recorded 640 mm (25.21 inches) from November 2-6. Heavy snowfall in the mountains during the 12th-13th prompted the closure of two mountain passes east of Mount Rainier until spring due to the threat of avalanches. This was the earliest such closure for one of the passes in 12 years (Associated Press).

    A strong storm system progressing through the eastern United States produced severe thunderstorms and tornadoes across portions of the Deep South and Southeast during the 14th-16th. Strong winds flattened a skating rink in Montgomery, Alabama on the 15th where more than 30 preschoolers were playing. Two children suffered injuries but there were no fatalities. An F-3 tornado ripped through Riegelwood, NC on the 16th causing eight deaths and twenty injuries (CNN).

    A strong extra-tropical cyclone developed off the southeast coast of the United States during November 21-22, producing a variety of weather along the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic coasts. Heavy rain and winds lashed the coastline from South Carolina northward through Virginia, while the earliest snowfall on record fell at both Charleston, SC and Savannah, GA. Snow flurries were reported as far south as central Florida on the 21st. Farther north, winds gusting over 115 km/hr (70 mph) were reported along the North Carolina coast, where significant coastal flooding and beach erosion was observed (Virginian-Pilot).

    Heavy snowfall blanketed areas of the U.S. Pacific Northwest during late-November. New snowfall accumulations of up to two feet (60 cm) fell in the Cascades of Washington and Oregon, while light snow fell each day during the 26th-29th in the Seattle area. Additionally, it was the wettest month on record in Seattle with 396 mm (15.59") of rainfall, or the wettest month in 115 years of record-keeping.

    Top of Page December 2006

    Across the United States, significant drought affected areas of the Plains and Rocky Mountains. Extreme drought was also concentrated in northern areas of Minnesota, parts of Wyoming and Nebraska, as well as sections of Texas and Oklahoma.

    In the United States, severe thunderstorms produced four tornadoes on Christmas Day in Florida. Columbia, Pasco, Lake and Volusia counties were hardest-hit, including the Daytona Beach area. A tornado generated considerable damage on the campus of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (see photo right), delaying the start of the spring semester (Orlando Business Journal).

    A powerful storm system that slammed into the U.S. Pacific Northwest during December 13-15 produced strong winds, heavy rainfall and higher elevation snow. Hurricane-force wind gusts caused power outages that affected 1.5 million homes across Washington and Oregon. There were 4 fatalities (Associated Press).

    A parade of Pacific storm systems brought heavy snow to mountainous regions of the U.S. Pacific Northwest and adjacent areas of Canada during December 2006. Several feet of snow had accumulated in some parts of the Cascade Mountains by mid-month.

    In the United States, a major winter storm affected Colorado on the 20th, dumping several feet of snow on areas of the Rocky Mountains. The snowstorm temporarily closed the Denver International Airport.


    For more information on Weather and Climate Extremes, refer to ...

    The Climate of 2006
    Extreme Weather and Climate Events

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    Top of Page Review of Global Events

    *Compiled from both NOAA and non-NOAA sources, including U.S. and international news media reports

    Significant Global Weather & Climate Events for 2006
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    JAN / FEB / MAR / APR / MAY / JUN / JUL / AUG / SEP / OCT / NOV / DEC

    Top of Page January 2006

    Severe drought continued in eastern Ethiopia, southern Somalia, portions of Tanzania, as well as northern and eastern Kenya. The president of Kenya declared a state of national disaster in areas affected by severe shortages of food and water resulting from the prolonged drought (IRIN). In Burundi, at least $75 million (USD) of the Burundian government's $168 million (USD) emergency funds for 2006 was earmarked to feed the country's drought-affected population (IRIN). An estimated 11 million people were faced with food shortages throughout East Africa and the Horn of Africa due to drought and other non-meteorological factors (IFRC).

    Strong winds and high temperatures fanned bushfires in southern Australia on the 26th. One large fire in the Grampians National Park in the state of Victoria burned more than 120,00 hectares (300,000 acres), destroyed 24 homes and killed 59,000 sheep. Wildfires in Victoria killed three people this month (Reuters). Very warm weather, concentrated in the eastern part of Australia, contributed to the sixth-warmest January on record for the country as a whole (Australian Bureau of Meteorology).

    Across Indonesia, heavy rains in mountainous central Java on the 4th produced a deadly mudslide in the village of Cijeruk. The slide buried 120 houses, with around 200 people killed (AFP). Along the north coast of Java by late-month, flooding and landslides claimed at least 7 additional lives (AFP).

    Heavy seasonal rainfall in Africa brought flooding to parts of southern Malawi, Namibia, northern Botswana, southern Angola, southern Mozambique and northern areas of South Africa during January 2006. In southern Malawi, nearly 1,800 dwellings and over 24,000 hectares (59,000 acres) of crops were destroyed by flooding since the beginning of December 2005 (IFRC).

    In Bolivia, heavy rainfall produced flooding along most of the major rivers in the country, including the Rio Grande, Guanay, Tipuani, Mapiri and Challana. Approximately 17,500 people were affected. Landslides and road obstructions caused some rural communities to be isolated, especially in the areas of Los Yungas and San Borja in La Paz and Beni departments (OCHA).

    In Brazil, flash flooding caused by heavy rains killed 4 people in Rio De Janeiro on the 27th. The fatalities occurred when a shopping mall parking garage became flooded (Associated Press).

    Heavy rains since December 2005 in Guyana caused flooding, especially along coastal areas of the country. An estimated 3,500 families were affected, including significant agricultural impacts (OCHA).

    Tropical Cyclone Clare developed in the Indian Ocean off the northwest coast of Western Australia on the 8th. The storm made landfall in Western Australia on the 9th near Dampier, or about 1200 km (750 miles) north of the state capital of Perth. Maximum sustained winds were near 110 km/hr (60 knots or 70 mph), with gusts as high as 185 km/hr (115 mph). Up to 1,500 people were evacuated from the area ahead of the cyclone (Reuters).

    Tropical Cyclone Boloetse formed in the southern Indian Ocean on the 25th, crossing Madagascar during the 29th-30th. The primary impact across Madagascar was heavy rainfall, with satellite rainfall estimates exceeding 150 mm (5.9 inches) in northern and central portions of the country. The storm emerged into the Mozambique Channel by month's end.

    Periods of heavy snowfall that began in Japan during the month of December 2005 persisted into mid-January. Areas of the country were buried under some of the deepest drifts on record (~4 meters or 13 feet), with 82 fatalities since the period of severe winter weather began. Injuries relating to the heavy snowfall totaled around 1,900. Nagano and Niigata prefectures, located to the northwest of Tokyo, were the worst affected. Tokyo received 7 cm (2.8 inches) of snowfall on the 21st, or the heaviest snowfall since January 27, 2001 (Reuters).

    Across northwestern China in the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, cold weather and heavy snowfall was blamed for the deaths of more than 9,000 head of livestock (IFRC).

    In India, frost was observed in New Delhi for the first time in 70 years as cold air sweeping in from the Himalayas produced a low temperature of 0.2°C (32.3°F) on the 9th. The record occurred on January 16, 1935, when Delhi reported -0.6°C (31°F). There were 180 deaths blamed on cold weather in India since early December 2005. In neighboring Bangladesh, unusually cold weather was blamed for 100 fatalities during the same time span (IFRC).

    In Russia, a severe cold wave which arrived during January 17-18 brought some of the coldest temperatures to the region in decades. Moscow temperatures plummeted to -30°C (-22°F), or the coldest readings since the winter of 1978-1979, when temperatures dropped to -38°C (-36°F). The coldest temperature on record is -42.1°C (-44°F), set in 1940. There have been numerous cold-related deaths, primarily the homeless (Reuters). Snow and cold weather penetrated unusually far to the south in eastern Europe, with heavy snow forcing the closure of the Acropolis in Athens, Greece on the 25th. Cold weather was blamed for 66 deaths in Ukraine, 27 in Romania, 14 in Poland, 10 in the Czech Republic and three in Bulgaria (Reuters). Temperatures in eastern Europe dipped to -35°C (-31°F) in mountains of northeast Italy.

    In Tajikistan, heavy snow was blamed for an avalanche near Dushanbe on the 31st that killed 18 people (IFRC). Across Afghanistan, a severe winter storm accompanied by heavy snowfall occurred in the Faizabad province on the 31st. The storm was blamed for 17 deaths (IFRC).

    Top of Page February 2006

    A large dust storm affected areas of North Africa and adjacent areas of the eastern Mediterranean region during late February, producing major reductions in visibility over a large area.

    Heavy rainfall in northern Iraq produced extensive river flooding that displaced an estimated 7,000 families. The most affected areas included the towns of Erbil, Sallahaddin, Kirkuk, Dyiala and Missan (IFRC).

    In Algeria, rare heavy rainfall in the Sahara Desert region of Tindouf produced severe flooding. The rain fell during the 10th-11th in a desert region of Algeria not far from the Moroccan and Mauritanian borders. Approximately 50,000 people were affected, with one fatality reported (OCHA/AFP).

    In Papua New Guinea, heavy rainfall produced significant flooding in the northwestern part of the country's Central Province during mid February. The flooding rendered an estimated 10,000 people homeless and caused one fatality (IFRC).

    In the southeastern Philippines, a deadly landslide triggered by heavy rainfall buried the village of Guinsaugon (population 1,400) on the 17th. There were more than 1,000 fatalities (Infoplease). The Philippine Geosciences Bureau estimated the landslide at 4 meters (13 feet) deep, covering an area of approximately 3 square kilometers (1.2 square miles).

    Across eastern Indonesia, landslides and floods caused by torrential rain on the 21st killed at least 33 people in the city of Manado (OCHA).

    In Yemen, heavy rainfall resulted in flash flooding on the 20th in the southwestern city of Dhamar. Floodwaters trapped around 1,900 people in their homes, and there were at least 5 deaths (AFP).

    In Lesotho, rainfall characterized as the heaviest in nearly two decades destroyed nearly one-third of the crops in the ground ahead of the April harvest (OHCA).

    Tropical Cyclone Boloetse, which formed in late January, affected Madagascar for a second time in early February as it tracked southeastward from the Mozambique Channel during the 4th-5th. While the cyclone remained offshore, it tracked close enough to the coastline to displace over 6,000 people, as nearly 2,500 private homes were damaged or destroyed in the extreme southern part of the country (UNICEF).

    Tropical Cyclone Emma developed in the south Indian Ocean on the 27th and made landfall in Western Australia's remote Pilbara coast on the 28th with maximum sustained winds near 65 km/hr (35 knots or 40 mph). Heavy rain was the primary impact from the storm, although Emma's approach prompted precautionary shutdowns of mining, oil and shipping operations (AAP).

    Top of Page March 2006

    A severe long-term drought continued throughout areas of Ethiopia, Somalia and Kenya. In Kenya, an estimated 3.5 million people were in need of food aid (Associated Press). Rainfall during the first week of March in Kenya did little to alleviate long-term dryness. In southern Somalia, nearly 2.1 million people were in need of critical food assistance as the drought was characterized as the worst in ten years. Similarly, nearly 2 million people in neighboring southern Ethiopia were in urgent need of food assistance due to drought (OCHA).

    Heavy rain/thunderstorms and strong winds occurred in areas of Peru during late February and early March 2006. By early March, over 65 houses had been destroyed displacing an estimated 325 people in northern Peru's Tumbes department. In the southern part of the country, additional flooding and mudslides were reported (IFRC).

    Across central and southern Malawi, heavy rainfall in early March produced flooding that left 8,000 people homeless. The floods occurred in the country's prime tourist district located in the southern Mangochi region. Flooding in the Mangochi district was reportedly the worst in 28 years (Associated Press).

    In Australia, heavy rainfall along the east coast stranded thousands of people on the 3rd. Around 2,500 residents of the city of Bellingen in northern New South Wales were temporarily isolated by river flooding (AFP).

    In Ecuador, heavy rainfall which began in February 2006 continued into the first week of March through coastal sections of the country. Over 11,000 families totaling over 50,000 people were severely affected by flooding. There were nine reported fatalities (OCHA).

    In Bangladesh, a severe thunderstorm produced a deadly tornado that affected six villages of Bagerhat District in the southern part of the country on the 4th. The tornado destroyed approximately 500 dwellings and uprooted hundreds of trees. More than 500 families were affected, with 4 deaths and more than 50 injuries reported (IFRC).

    In the Democractic Republic of Congo (DRC), a severe thunderstorm produced a possible tornado that impacted the town of Oicha. There were 3 confirmed deaths and 66 injuries, and more than 1,000 building sustained damage (OCHA).

    In Germany, two people were killed and 80,000 homes suffered power outages when a tornado struck the northern city of Hamburg late on the 27th. The storm ripped off roofs and overturned several cars. Around 300,000 people in Hamburg spent the night without electricity (AFP).

    Tropical Cyclone Diwa developed in the south Indian Ocean east of Madagascar on the 4th, passing approximately 230 km (140 miles) to the west of Reunion Island (France) on the 5th. Heavy rainfall and winds gusting as high as 120 km/hr (65 knots or 75 mph) occurred on the island, producing power outages to 10,000 homes and water utilities interruptions to 20,000 (AFP).

    Tropical Cyclone Larry developed in the Coral Sea on the 18th, reaching Australia's Queensland coast just south of Cairns near Innisfail on the 20th. Maximum sustained winds at the time of landfall were at least 185 km/hr (100 knots or 115 mph) with gusts as high as 290 km/hr (155 knots or 180 mph). While there were no fatalities, there were 30 injuries with damage to over 55 percent of the homes in Innisfail (Associated Press). The cyclone was described as one of the most powerful cyclones to hit Australia in decades, wiping out nearly 90 percent of the banana crop in the center of Australia's banana production region (Reuters).

    Tropical Cyclone Glenda developed in the Timor Sea off the northern tip of Western Australia on the 27th. Glenda reached the coast of Western Australia on the 30th, making landfall near Onslow (located about 1,390 km or 860 miles north of Perth) with maximum sustained winds near 195 km/hr (105 knots or 120 mph). The cyclone prompted evacuations, closed oil fields and raised concerns of significant flooding in the region (Reuters).

    In the United Kingdom, an outbreak of cold, Arctic air affected northern sections of the country on the 1st. Snow fell across Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland where accumulations of up to 12 cm (5 inches) were observed, forcing the closure of many schools and businesses. Temperatures fell to -6°C (21°F) at Sennybridge in Wales (BBC News).

    Top of Page April 2006

    A sandstorm originating along the China/Mongolia border affected Beijing on the 17th. It was the eighth sandstorm of 2006 for the Chinese capital, and reportedly the worst so far in 2006. Reduced visibilities also spread eastward to the Korean Peninsula (BBC News).

    In Australia, flooding in the outback town of Katherine forced the evacuation of nearly 600 people. Days of heavy rainfall caused the Katherine River to rise above the flood stage. The town of Katherine, population 2,000, is located about 300 km (185 miles) south of Darwin in the Northern Territory (Reuters).

    Thunderstorms in Yemen produced flash flooding during the 3rd-5th. At least 25 people were killed from the storms and flooding, including a number lightning-related deaths (AFP).

    Flooding in Colombia was prompted by heavy rainfall that began in early March 2006 and continued through much of April. At least 70 people were killed by flooding and mudslides since the rains began. The worst disaster occurred along the Pacific coastline near the city of Buenaventura, where a landslide killed 31 people on the 13th. More than 225 homes were destroyed and 2,000 damaged (AFP).

    Heavy rainfall and snowmelt produced extensive flooding along the Danube River in April. The river reached its highest level in 111 years (Xinhua). Areas of Hungary, Bulgaria, Serbia and Romania were the hardest hit, with many roads and bridges in the region damaged and expansive areas of farmland flooded. Thousands of people were displaced from their homes (Reuters, Associated Press).

    In Indonesia, monsoon-related rainfall produced flooding in East Java during mid-April. At least 23 deaths were reported by the 20th, with most of the fatalities occurring in the Bendungan subdistrict (AFP).

    Across northern Argentina, heavy rainfall produced flooding in the northern provinces of Salta, Jujuy and Formosa. By late in the month, at least 150 homes and several bridges were destroyed, displacing as many as 6,000 people (IFRC).

    Across eastern India, strong thunderstorms produced heavy rainfall and strong winds in the city of Kolkata and surrounding districts on the 25th. Winds gusting as high as 109 km/hr (68 mph) temporarily knocked out power to much of the city. There were nine fatalities (AFP).

    Tropical Cyclone Monica developed in the Coral Sea on the 17th and reached Australia's Cape York Peninsula in northern Queensland near Cape Sidmouth by the 19th with maximum sustained winds near 150 km/hr (80 knots or 90 mph). Monica was the fourth tropical cyclone to strike Australia since the beginning of March 2006. Monica re-strengthened over the warm waters of the Gulf of Carpentaria, reaching maximum sustained wind speeds of 290 km/hr (155 knots or 180 mph) before making landfall in the vicinity of Maningrida on the 24th. Strong winds and heavy rains lashed the region. Monica contributed to a record amount of April rainfall at Darwin, where 383 mm (15.1 inches) were recorded through the 27th. The old April rainfall record was 357 mm (14.1) observed in 1953 (News Limited). Monica was the strongest tropical cyclone on record to affect the Northern Territory (Australian Bureau of Meteorology).

    Tropical Cyclone Mala formed in the Indian Ocean on the 24th and reached the coast of Burma (Myanmar) in the Gwa area on the 29th with maximum sustained winds near 185 km/hr (100 knots or 115 mph). There were 22 reported fatalities in Burma (The Irrawaddy).

    Top of Page May 2006

    In India, a heat wave during early May produced temperatures above 40°C (104°F) and resulted in at least 53 fatalities (AFP). Heat waves are common in May in South Asia before the traditional onset of the rainy season in late May and early June.

    Drought in China threatened the drinking water for nearly 14 million people in the northern part of the country. About 16.3 million hectares (40 million acres) of agriculture land, or more than 12 percent of the nation's total, was affected by drought according to Zhang Zhitong, the State Flood Control and Drought Relief Headquarters executive director (Associated Press).

    Torrential rainfall in Suriname during early May produced the worst disaster in recent times for the interior of the country, according to the National Coordination Centre for Disaster Control (NCCR). The flooding affected at least 25,000 people, and around 25,000-30,000 square kilometers (9,600-11,600 square miles) of the interior were submerged by water. (IFRC)

    Three days of heavy rainfall during the latter part of May brought devastating flooding and mudslides to parts of northern Thailand. More than 100 people may have died in flash floods that began at the start of the country's rainy season, which typically lasts until October. The province of Uttaradit was the worst affected. Rail services to northern Thailand were temporarily suspended (BBC News).

    Heavy rainfall that began in late April 2006 continued into early May in Guizhou province of southwestern China. The resultant flooding was blamed for 22 deaths and forced the evacuation of 36,900 residents from their homes (AFP).

    In Iran, heavy rainfall that began on the 8th produced significant flooding in the northwestern Ardebil province. There were at least 14 fatalities and 700 homes damaged or destroyed by the floodwaters (AFP).

    Severe flooding, prompted by heavy rains, occurred in northern Tanzania's Moshi district near Mount Kilimanjaro in mid-May. Nearly 1,000 houses were submerged by floodwaters, rendering over 19,000 homeless (AFP).

    In Cuba, thunderstorms dumped heavy rainfall in Havana, producing flash flooding that killed three people. Nearly 203 mm (8 inches) of rain fell in just two hours late on the 23rd, crippling traffic and flooding tunnels (Reuters).

    Typhoon Chanchu developed in the western Pacific Ocean on the 8th, reaching typhoon intensity by the 10th. The typhoon crossed the Philippines during the 11th-13th and produced torrential rain, with 41 reported deaths and thousands homeless (AFP/Associated Press). Chanchu emerged into the South China Sea on the 13th and made landfall between Shantou in Guangdong province and Zhangzhou City in Fujian province on the 17th with maximum sustained winds near 140 km/hr (75 knots or 85 mph). There were 29 deaths reported in China (Xinhua). Meanwhile, at least 150 Vietnamese fisherman who were caught at sea by Chanchu were listed as missing, while another 28 were confirmed dead (Associated Press). Chanchu was the strongest typhoon on record to enter the South China Sea in the month of May, according to the Hong Kong Observatory (AFP).

    In South Africa, snow fell in higher elevations of the country, with some mountain passes in the Karoo region closed to traffic. Snow also covered the Maluti mountains in neighboring Lesotho on the 22nd. Unseasonably cold weather was observed throughout the region (BBC News).

    Top of Page June 2006

    Wet-season rainfall alleviated dryness in parts of the Greater Horn of Africa during May and June 2006. Despite the welcome rainfall, long-term drought persisted in central and eastern Kenya as well as eastern Ethiopia and central Somalia.

    In southern China, rainfall rates on the order of 99 mm (3.5 inches) in two hours forced the Bashili River out of its banks, flooding 11 villages in Fujian province. In the southwestern province of Sichuan, a landslide prompted by heavy rainfall killed 11 people on the 19th in Shiji Village (Xinhua). On the 25th, flash flooding in the Hunan province of southern China killed 11 people (Associated Press). The Chinese government characterized the summer flooding as the worst in 30 years in parts of the country, with 349 weather-related deaths in June (Associated Press/AFP).

    In India, monsoon rainfall produced flooding and landslides in the northeastern states of Assam and Tripura. There were 8 reported deaths and 75,000 people displaced from their homes by the second week of June. Nationwide, an early onset of the monsoon season (late May 2006) resulted in 308 reported fatalities due to flooding by the end of June (AFP/DPA).

    In Indonesia, torrential rainfall produced flooding on eastern Sulawesi Island in the South Sulawesi province on the 19th-20th. In the hardest-hit district of Sinjai, at least two roads were blocked by landslides, and water and mud reached 2.1 meters (7 feet) high. There were at least 216 reported fatalities (Associated Press/Reuters/IFRC).

    Unseasonably cold temperatures affected areas of Australia during June, with many locations breaking their all-time record minimum temperatures for the month. Averaged across the nation as a whole, it was the fourth coldest June in the post-1950 record.

    Top of Page July 2006

    Hot weather enveloped much of Europe during mid-to-late July, with temperatures surpassing 32°C (90°F). In Britain on the afternoon of the 19th, temperatures reached 36.5°C (97.7°F) at Wisley, or the hottest July temperature ever recorded in Britain. By late month across Europe, at least 50 deaths were blamed on the heat in Spain, France, Italy and the Netherlands (Associated Press/AFP).

    In Afghanistan, a lack of rainfall beginning in April 2006 has resulted in significant drought across the country. An estimated 2.5 million people were affected by the drought (Government of Afghanistan).

    Heavy monsoon-related rainfall caused a mudslide in northern Pakistan's Kalam Valley in the village of Ghaeel on July 3. The mudslide buried three houses, killing 22 people (OCHA). Later in the month, flooding prompted by torrential rainfall affected the northwestern village of Gorvek along the Afghanistan border. There were 13 deaths and 300 injuries (Associated Press).

    Heavy monsoon rainfall in India was blamed for 41 deaths across the country during the 4th-5th. Flooding crippled Mumbai as road and rail transportation was impacted by floodwaters (Reuters). Heavy rain affected Kolkata (Calcutta) in West Bengal state on the 19th producing widespread flooding in the city. About 180 mm (7 inches) of rain was recorded (AFP). Elsewhere in India by late-month, 110,000 people were evacuated from flooded areas of Maharashtra and Gujarat states. By the end of July, the death toll from monsoon-related flooding was near 500 since the end of May 2006 (DPA).

    In Turkey, flooding from heavy rains killed at least 8 people during July 1-2. The most significant damage was in the northeastern part of the country near the Black Sea from the cities of Samsun to Giresun (AFP).

    In Romania, thunderstorms produced flooding during the July 1-2 in the northern part of the country, resulting in the deaths of 11 people (AFP).

    Rainfall generated flooding and produced landslides in central Chile during July 10-12. There were 19 reported fatalities, seven of which occurred in a landslide in Chiguayante (OCHA/Associated Press).

    Across the Korean Peninsula, heavy rainfall that initiated with the arrival of Ewiniar during the 10th-14th continued in the wake of the tropical weather system as the Northeast Monsoon promoted more excessive rainfall. Flooding was blamed for hundreds of deaths in North Korea and at least 25 deaths in South Korea (Associated Press). Excessive rainfall in neighboring Japan produced flooding and mudslides that claimed at least 22 lives (OCHA/AFP).

    Tropical Storm Bilis developed as a depression in the western Pacific Ocean on the 8th and reached tropical storm strength the next day. As the storm passed to the north of the Philippines, heavy rainfall was blamed for dozens of deaths in the northern part of that country. Bilis tracked across the northern tip of Taiwan by the 13th before making landfall in southeastern China's Fujian province with maximum sustained winds near 100 km/hr (55 knots or 65 mph). There were at least 575 deaths attributed to Bilis in Fujian, Guangdong and Hunan provinces. Bilis prompted the evacuation of 2.5 million people, and resulted in direct economic losses near $3.3 billion (USD) (OCHA/Reuters).

    Typhoon Kaemi developed as a depression in the western Pacific Ocean on the 18th, reaching typhoon strength by the 20th. Kaemi crossed Taiwan on the 24th with maximum sustained winds near 130 km/hr (70 knots or 80 mph), then made landfall in southeastern China's Fujian province near Gulangyu the next day. Rainfall produced widespread flooding that was blamed for at least 34 deaths and 75 missing persons in China, along with the destruction of thousands of homes (AFP/OCHA).

    Top of Page August 2006

    Drought in China affected about 18 million people in August, or the worst drought to affect the country in 50 years, according to the state news agency Xinhua. The southwestern province of Sichuan was the worst affected. In Chongqing, no rain had fallen for more than 70 days, and two-thirds of the rivers had dried up (BBC News).

    In Japan, a heat wave brought electricity demand to record levels in August on the islands of Hokkaido and Kyushu. Maximum temperatures reached 35°C (95°F) on Kyushu (Reuters).

    In Ethiopia, flooding across the country during August 2006 claimed 626 lives. Some of the worst flooding occurred along the swollen Omo River (Associated Press).

    Monsoon-related flooding continued across India during August. In Gujarat state, the city of Surat was embattled by flooding. Surat is the capital of India's diamond-cutting industry, and the flooding caused an estimated $29 million (USD) in daily economic losses. Flooding also halted gas and petroleum production in India's largest gas fields in Gujarat state. Across the nation, hundreds of deaths were reported during August with nearly one million people losing their homes due to floods in the eastern part of the country (AFP/Reuters).

    In Pakistan, monsoon-related flooding was blamed for more than 185 deaths from late July through mid-August 2006 (AFP). In neighboring eastern Afghanistan, heavy rainfall generated flooding that claimed at least 35 lives (Associated Press).

    Across the Philippines, landslides and flash floods triggered by heavy rainfall killed at least six people and destroyed eight villages in the southern part of the country. The hardest-hit area was the southern island of Mindanao where flash flooding and mudslides occurred on the 14th (AFP). In Vietnam, monsoon-related flooding in central and northern regions of the country was blamed for 42 deaths by the 20th (Reuters).

    Across northern provinces of Thailand, incessant rainfall during late-month produced flooding that was blamed for eight deaths. Flooding in the Nan province was reportedly the worst in 40 years (IFRC). In neighboring Cambodia, flooding along the Mekong River resulted in eight fatalities (AFP).

    Typhoon Prapiroon developed as a depression just east of the Philippines on the 31st, crossing the Philippines by the 1st and reaching typhoon strength by the next day. Prapiroon made landfall in the southern part of China's Guangdong province on the 3rd with maximum sustained winds near 130 km/hr (70 knots or 80 mph). The typhoon was blamed for at least 80 deaths in China after killing six in the Philippines (Reuters/OCHA).

    Typhoon Saomai developed in the western Pacific Ocean on the 4th, passing near Guam on the 5th as a tropical storm. Saomai reached typhoon status the next day, and reached the Chinese coastline on the 10th, just south of Wenzhou along the border of Fujian and Zhejiang provinces. Maximum sustained winds at the time of landfall were near 240 km/hr (130 knots or 150 mph). The typhoon prompted the evacuation of 1.5 million people from flood-prone areas, and resulted in at least 441 fatalities. Saomai was characterized as the most powerful typhoon to strike China in 50 years (BBC News/Associated Press/Reuters).

    Hurricane Ernesto developed in the eastern Caribbean Sea as a depression on the 24th and attained tropical storm status the next day. Ernesto became a hurricane just before crossing the western tip of Haiti on the 27th. The storm was blamed for 4 deaths on Haiti (OCHA). Ernesto then tracked across the western half of Cuba before emerging over the Florida Straits as a tropical storm on the 29th. The storm moved across the Florida peninsula, briefly weakening into a tropical depression before re-strengthening to tropical storm status as it emerged off the southeast coast of the United States on the 31st.

    A storm system affected Swaziland during August 1-3, generating strong wind gusts as high as 120 km/hr (75 mph). The winds caused significant structural damage to buildings, injured several people and killed one person. As many as 100 houses were destroyed (IFRC).

    Top of Page September 2006

    In Ethiopia, extensive flooding in August 2006 continued in September. Flooding was blamed for at least nine fatalities in Dire Dawa on the 13th (OHCA). Heavy rainfall that began last month continued in September in parts of Niger and Burkina Faso, rendering 22,000 people homeless. Nigeria, Mali and Mauritania also experienced flooding rains (AFP).

    Across eastern India, heavy rainfall during the 21st-25th produced flooding that caused 19 deaths in the state of Bihar (AFP). Monthly rainfall anomalies were in excess of +200 mm (7.9 inches) in southwestern India.

    Hurricane John developed in the eastern Pacific Ocean during August, but made landfall along Mexico's Baja Peninsula on the 1st near San Jose del Cabo with maximum sustained winds near 175 km/hr (95 knots or 110 mph). John was blamed for four deaths in Mexico (AFP). The storm also produced minor flooding farther north in parts of the U.S. Southwest, including parts of southern California, southern Arizona and New Mexico, as well as west Texas (Associated Press).

    Typhoon Shanshan developed in the Philippine Sea on the 10th, reaching typhoon strength the next day. Shanshan moved across Japan's southern island of Kyushu on the 17th with maximum sustained winds near 175 km/hr (95 knots or 110 mph). There were at least eight fatalities and around 100 injured in Japan (AFP).

    Hurricane Lane formed on the 13th off the west coast of Mexico and reached hurricane status by the 15th. Lane made landfall in Mexico on the 16th in the state of Sinaloa about 32 km (20 miles) southeast of El Dorado with maximum sustained winds near 205 km/hr (100 knots or 125 mph). The hurricane was responsible for at least four fatalities in Mexico due to flooding and landslides (OCHA).

    Hurricane Gordon developed as a depression in the central Atlantic Ocean on the 10th and became a hurricane by the 12th. Gordon passed through the Azores on the 20th, with winds gusting to 132 km/hr (81 mph) at Santa Maria. Gordon lost its tropical characteristics before reaching the Spanish coastal region of Galicia on the 21st, but still produced wind gusts to 140 km/hr (85 mph) (AFP). The extra-tropical remnants of Gordon brought strong winds and rain to the United Kingdom on the 22nd. Winds gusting as high as 130 km/hr (81 mph) produced power outages to over 100,000 customers, mostly in Northern Ireland (Times Online).

    Typhoon Xangsane initially developed in the Philippine Sea on the 25th, crossing the Philippines as a typhoon on the 27th-28th with maximum sustained winds near 230 km/hr (125 knots or 145 mph). Xangsane was blamed for 110 deaths in the Philippines, caused 88 injuries, and knocked out power to more than half of the main island of Luzon. In Manila, the stock exchange, currency market, schools and government offices were temporarily closed as the typhoon was characterized as the worst to hit the city in over 35 years (Reuters). The typhoon made a final landfall in central Vietnam near Danang on October 1 with maximum sustained winds near 165 km/hr (90 knots or 105 mph). In Vietnam, there were 68 deaths and nearly 320,000 homes were destroyed or submerged (Reuters).

    Top of Page October 2006

    In Australia, severe drought affected large areas of the southeastern part of the country during October. New South Wales recorded its driest October on record, Victoria its second driest, with South Australia and Queensland both ranking in the bottom ten years. Averaged across the country as a whole, it was the 11th driest October on record (Australian Bureau of Meteorology). Australian Prime Minister John Howard characterized the drought as the "worst drought in living memory" (New Zealand Herald).

    While long-term drought persisted in areas of Somalia and Ethiopia, mostly beneficial rainfall was noted in areas of Ethiopia, Sudan and into areas of West Africa. Localized areas of flooding occurred in parts of the Ethiopian Highlands. More extensive flooding occurred in the Jubba and Shabelle River basins, where at least 67 people were killed in southeastern Ethiopia. Of those fatalities, at least ten were killed by crocodiles from the swollen rivers (AFP).

    In Thailand during early October, heavy rainfall in the wake of the remnants of Typhoon Xangsane was responsible for 32 deaths across the country, and affected 1.8 million people. In neighboring Myanmar (Burma), at least 10 people were killed in the city of Mandalay in some of the worst flooding in recent memory (AFP/Royal Thai Government).

    In southwestern China, torrential rainfall during October 6-12 in the Honghe prefecture of Yunnan province triggered flooding and landslides in the mountainous region, killing 20 people. The flooding forced the evacuation of 20,000 people and caused the destruction of 2,000 homes (AFP).

    Across Turkey, flooding on the 31st was blamed for 38 deaths. Fourteen of the fatalities occurred when a mini-bus was swept away by floodwaters near the town of Cinar in Diyarbakir province (Associated Press/IFRC).

    Typhoon Cimaron developed in the Philippine Sea as a depression on the 26th, reaching typhoon intensity by the next day. Cimaron crossed northern Luzon in the Philippines on the 29th with maximum sustained winds near 260 km/hr (140 knots or 160 mph). There were at least ten reported fatalities in the Philippines from the typhoon (Reuters). Cimaron dissipated over the South China Sea by November 4.

    Top of Page November 2006

    In China, extreme drought encompassed much of east-central China during mid-November. Water levels along the upper reaches of the Yellow River, China's second longest river, dropped to a historic low early in the month (Reuters/Xinhua).

    Flooding in Kenya claimed 47 lives since October 25, 2006. Additional flooding continued farther to the north in the Jubba and Shabelle River basins in Somalia and Ethiopia (AFP). Flooding in neighboring Ethiopia was blamed for 116 deaths and the displacement of more than 300,000 people (AFP).

    In northern Iraq, flash floods caused by torrential rain killed 18 people and injured 20 on the 5th-6th. The flooding occurred in Irbil province, destroying nine bridges and several houses (Associated Press).

    In western Afghanistan, heavy rainfall during November 16-20 produced flash flooding that caused 120 deaths in the Badghis, Farah and Uruzgan provinces (Associated Press).

    In Japan, thunderstorms associated with a frontal system spawned a tornado on Hokkaido in the northern town of Saroma on the 7th. It was the deadliest tornado on record in Japan with nine deaths and 25 injuries, with the previous record occurring in September 2006 when there were three deaths on the southern island of Kyushu (BBC News/Associated Press).

    Typhoon Durian developed in the western Pacific Ocean on the 25th, reaching typhoon status by the 28th. Durian struck the northern Philippines on the 30th, passing south of Manila, with maximum sustained winds near 230 km/hr (125 knots or 145 mph). There were at least 406 fatalities in the Philippines, primarily caused by mudslides from torrential rainfall (International Herald Tribune).

    Top of Page December 2006

    Heavy rainfall that began in October 2006 across the Horn of Africa continued into early December. Flooding in areas of Somalia, Ethiopia and Kenya impacted hundreds of thousands of people (IFRC). In Kenya alone, the number of affected people was estimated at 723,000 (OCHA).

    In Haiti, heavy rainfall in late November and early December in the western part of the country washed away roads and bridges, wiped out crops and killed at least three people (Associated Press).

    In Indonesia, two days of heavy rain prompted a landslide in Solok regency, West Sumatra on the 16th. There were eighteen deaths as a result of the landslide (Jakarta Post).

    During the last ten days of December, heavy rains in Indonesia's Aceh province produced severe flooding that displaced 127,000 people. There were 126 deaths on Sumatra island, with 76 of the fatalities occurring in Aceh province (Associated Press/UN-WFP).

    Heavy rainfall in southern Malaysia forced the evacuation of around 59,000 people by mid-to-late December 2006. There were at least 12 fatalities (AFP).

    In the United Kingdom, a tornado struck northwest London on the 7th, damaging several homes and injuring at least 6 people. On average, about 33 tornadoes are reported annually in Britain (Associated Press).

    Severe thunderstorms, including tornadoes, impacted portions of Argentina, Uruguay and southern Brazil during December 17-21. There were at least thirteen deaths in Argentina, two in Uruguay and one in Brazil (MetSul Meteorologica).

    After crossing the Philippines on November 30, Typhoon Durian skirted the south coast of Vietnam during December 4-5 as it weakened to tropical storm intensity. There were at least 67 fatalities in southern Vietnam (Reuters).

    Typhoon Utor developed in the Philippine Sea on the 7th, reaching typhoon strength by the 9th. Utor crossed the central Philippines during the 9th with maximum sustained winds estimated near 140 km/hr (75 knots or 85 mph). It was the fifth typhoon since September to impact the Philippines. There were four fatalities (Reuters).

    Tropical Cyclone Bondo developed in the southern Indian Ocean on the 18th, and reached the coast of Madagascar near Mahajanga as a tropical storm on the 25th. Maximum sustained winds at the time of landfall were near 115 km/hr (60 knots or 70 mph). The primary impact was heavy rainfall across northern Madagascar.


    For more information on Weather and Climate Extremes, refer to ...

    The Climate of 2006
    Extreme Weather and Climate Events

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    For further information, contact:

    Jay Lawrimore
    NOAA/National Climatic Data Center
    151 Patton Avenue
    Asheville, NC 28801-5001
    fax: 828-271-4328
    email: Jay.Lawrimore@noaa.gov
    -or-
    Scott Stephens
    NOAA/National Climatic Data Center
    151 Patton Avenue
    Asheville, NC 28801-5001
    fax: 828-271-4328
    email: Scott.Stephens@noaa.gov

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