Department of Commerce

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

December 1999-February 2000
in Historical Perspective

National Climatic Data Center, 13 March 2000

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Global Temp Anomalies, Dec99-Feb00
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The global blended temperature product for December 1999 through February 2000 shows below average sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the eastern Pacific reflecting persistent La Nina conditions. Looking at surface areas around the globe, the warmest seasonal anomalies were noted across the central portion of North American continent and from central Russia into western Siberia. Some of these areas were more than 4 degrees C above the 1992-2000 average. In contrast, the coldest areas during this period were across Mongolia, parts of northeast China, and near the Bering sea in Siberia. Temperatures were also quite cool across portions of Australia and southern Africa; these two areas also experienced frequent rains and flooding during the period. See the Global Analysis and Global Regional Analysis pages for more details on the global climate.

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Global Time Series
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The warmest seasonal anomalies occurred across North America, central and northern Europe, and central Russia. Some areas were more than 4 degrees C. above the long term mean. Coolest seasonal anomalies were experienced in the Mediterranean area and northern Africa, around the Bering sea in eastern Siberia and across a large part of Australia. Some areas across eastern Siberia and interior Australia had anomalies around 4 degrees C. below the long term mean.

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USHCN Time Series Dec 1999- Feb 2000
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Preliminary U.S. Historical Climatological Network (USHCN) data for winter (December 1999-February 2000) indicate mean temperature for the three-month period averaged across the contiguous United States was much above the long-term mean and ranked as the warmest winter since 1900. Nearly 57% of the country was much warmer than normal while less than one percent of the country averaged much cooler than normal. Five of the last six winter seasons have been much above normal.

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During the December 1999- February 2000 period, several areas of the world experienced extremes in climate. The worst disasters in terms of human misery were two flooding events; one in Venezuela, the other in Mozambique. Each of these events caused several thousand deaths, and malaria is causing additional deaths in flooded areas in southeast Africa. Elsewhere around the globe, winter storms, drought, heatwaves and floods took their toll on various areas. More complete information is available under the Climate Watch December 1999 , January 2000 , February 2000.
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For all climate questions other than questions concerning this report, please contact the National Climatic Data Center's Climate Services Division:

Climate Services Division
NOAA/National Climatic Data Center
151 Patton Avenue, Room 120
Asheville, NC 28801-5001
fax: 828-271-4876
phone: 828-271-4800
email: ncdc.orders@noaa.gov
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For questions about this report, please contact:

David Easterling
NOAA/National Climatic Data Center
151 Patton Avenue
Asheville, NC 28801-5001
fax: 828-271-4675
email: david.easterling@noaa.gov

-or-

Mike Changery
NOAA/National Climatic Data Center
151 Patton Avenue
Asheville, NC 28801-5001
fax: 828-271-4750
email: mchangry@ncdc.noaa.gov

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