National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Climate of 2000 - August
Global Regional Analysis

National Climatic Data Center, 15 September 2000

Surface Wetness Anomaly Surface Wetness Anomaly

The featured product in this month's analysis is the Asian surface wetness anomaly. For the second month in a row, the greatest positive wetness anomalies were observed over parts of southeast Asia. These were again associated with periodic heavy rainfall and tropical systems in the region, especially across eastern Thailand, Cambodia into parts of Vietnam. This region was exceptionally wet during the last three months and is featured in the June - August report as well. The heavest rain and severe flooding in August occurred across parts of the Mekong Delta in Vietnam, northeast Thailand and much of Cambodia. Positive wetness anomalies were observed also over south central India, Bangladesh, parts of northeast China into eastern Mongolia. Flooding and the loss of life was reported in some of these areas especially across India and Bangladesh. In contrast, large negative (dry) anomalies were observed over much of interior northern India and Pakistan and in parts of central and interior eastern China. Some of these areas continue to suffer from prolonged drought. In addition, according to media reports, both Iran and Iraq are suffering from long term drought and shortages of drinking water. Climatologically, these areas receive little or no rainfall until November or December.

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Contents of This Report:

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Top of Page Asian Precipitation Time Series

As stated above, this region experienced major flooding during the last several months. The average precipitation anomaly across this 10 degree area was about 85 mm (3.3 in) of rain. However, certain areas received much more precipitation. Media reports indicate that flooding in the Mekong Delta caused extension crop losses to this region where 90% of rice grown for export is produced.

This region normally receives most of its rain in the August-November season due to the the influx of tropical moisture. The rainfall is heaviest in highland locations and along the Pacific coast. Asian Precipitation Time Series
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Top of Page Asian Temperature Anomalies

Persistent cloudiness across much of southern Asia kept the region cooler than average during the month. This cloudy pattern is associated with an active monsoon season which has caused flooding in parts of the region.
Temperature Anomalies across Asia
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Warm anomalies were noted over portions of central and northern Asia, around the Aral sea and in parts of northwestern China. The combination of warm temperatures and the lack of rainfall in the Jilian province of northeast China lead to drought conditions during the month.

Top of Page European Temperature Anomalies

A broad westerly flow off the Atlantic kept most of western Europe near the 1992-2000 August average. Further to the east over southeast Europe, a ridge of high pressure aloft kept the region warmer than average. Cool conditions were noted over northeastern Europe into parts of Scandinavia.
Most of the central part of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) was near average in terms of temperatures. Negative (cool) anomalies were observed over much of the northern portion of the FSU into northern and central Siberia. Positive (warm) anomalies were noted in areas surrounding the Caspian and Aral seas. In Uzbekistan an on-going drought is having a devastating impact on crops and livestock, while also causing a rapid deterioration in health and sanitary conditions. European Temperature Product
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Top of Page African Temperature Anomalies

Much of the African continent had temperatures again near or below the norm for August. This is similar to the pattern observed in May,June and July , but the opposite was observed in April when much of the continent was warmer than average.

African Temperature Anomalies
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In contrast, only a few small areas had positive temperature anomalies. These areas include parts of the western portion of the continent in South Africa and Nambia as well as a small area of the Sahel.

Top of Page South American Snow Cover Product

For the second month in a row, frequent storminess brought snows to the extreme southern sections of South America. Snow cover durations were above average across the mountainous areas in extreme southern Chile and Argentina.
A few spots in the highlands of the central Andes also had above average snowcover duration. Snow cover was below average across the northern Andes in parts of Bolivia, northern Chile and southern Peru. South American Snow Cover Product
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References:

Basist, A., N.C. Grody, T.C. Peterson and C.N. Williams, 1998: Using the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager to Monitor Land Surface Temperatures, Wetness, and Snow Cover. Journal of Applied Meteorology, 37, 888-911.


Peterson, Thomas C. and Russell S. Vose, 1997: An overview of the Global Historical Climatology Network temperature data base. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 78, 2837-2849.

For all climate questions other than questions concerning this report, please contact the National Climatic Data Center's Climate Services Division:

Climate Services Division
NOAA/National Climatic Data Center
151 Patton Avenue, Room 120
Asheville, NC 28801-5001
fax: 828-271-4876
phone: 828-271-4800
email: ncdc.orders@noaa.gov

For more information, refer also to ...
SSMI Derived Products
Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN)
The Blended GHCN - SSM/I Product
The Global Temperature Anomalies

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For further information on the historical climate perspective presented in this report, contact:

Tom Ross
NOAA/National Climatic Data Center
151 Patton Avenue
Asheville, NC 28801-5001
fax: 828-271-4499
email: tom.ross@noaa.gov

-or-

Jay Lawrimore
NOAA/National Climatic Data Center
151 Patton Avenue
Asheville, NC 28801-5001
fax: 828-271-4328
email: jay.lawrimore@noaa.gov
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