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National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Climate of 1999
August in Historical Perspective

National Climatic Data Center, 15 September 1999

Global Temp Anomalies, August
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Based on preliminary data for the month, the global mean temperature for August 1999 was higher than the long-term average for August.
In fact, for nearly every month in the past 10 years, the global mean land temperature has been above the long-term (1880-1998) mean. The globally-averaged ocean temperature anomaly was only slightly above the mean, drawing the combined land and ocean anomaly for August down to below the record set in 1998. Even so, the global land and ocean combined mean temperature for August was still above the long-term average. Global Monthly Anomalies
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For more information on how these anomalies are computed, see the pages on the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) and the Global Temperature Anomalies.
U.S. Temp Anomalies, August
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Based upon preliminary data, mean temperatures for August 1999 averaged across the contiguous U.S. were above the long-term mean, but not as high as last year or other periods in the past. See the U.S. National Analysis and U.S. Regional / Statewide Analyses pages for more details on the U.S. climate. The bars in this graph are departures from the 1895-1998 mean. The curved line is a nine-point binomial filter which shows the decadal-scale variations.
Based on preliminary data, August 1999 precipitation averaged across the contiguous U.S. ranked well below the long-term mean.
Severe to extreme drought conditions within a huge area of the eastern and southern U.S dominate the precipitation story for the U.S. despite the extremely wet conditions in parts of the northern and central Great Plains, southern Rockies, and Northwest. See the Drought in the U.S. page for more information on the areas affected by the drought. The bars in this graph are departures from the 1895-1998 mean. The curved line is a nine-point binomial filter which shows the decadal-scale variations. US Precip Anomalies, August
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U.S. Temp Anomalies, January-August
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Based upon preliminary data, the mean temperature for the contiguous U.S. for the 8-month period of January through August 1999 was much above the long-term mean. See the Drought in the U.S. as well as the U.S. National Analysis and U.S. Regional / Statewide Analyses pages for more details on the U.S. climate, including those areas with the above normal temperatures and associated drought. The bars in this graph are departures from the 1895-1998 mean. The curved line is a nine-point binomial filter which shows the decadal-scale variations.
Although there have been episodes of above normal precipitation in various areas of the country over the past 8 months, some areas have been experiencing extended drought.
Precipitation totals averaged across the contiguous U.S. for the 8-month period January through August 1999 have been well below that of the past several years, but fall only slightly below the long-term mean. The bars in this graph are departures from the 1895-1998 mean. The curved line is a nine-point binomial filter which shows the decadal-scale variations. See the Drought in the U.S. as well as the U.S. National Analysis and U.S. Regional / Statewide Analyses pages for more details on the distribution of precipitation and the areas of drought. US Precip Anomalies, August
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Top of Page Extreme Events

During August 1999, several areas of the world experienced extremes in climate such as record high temperatures, severe droughts, tropical systems and flooding. In the U.S., record heat combined with the lack of precipitation expanded drought conditions in the eastern half of the country. A full report is available at the Drought in the U.S. page. Around the rest of the world, drought affected portions of Uganda and Kenya while flooding along the Yangtze river in China has killed 725 people and displaced 1.7 million people. Heavy rains and floods hit portions of eastern India and Bangladesh, Korea, southeast Asia and northern Sudan. A full report on selected global extremes is available under the Climate-Watch, August 1999 page.
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For all climate questions other than questions concerning this report, please contact the National Climatic Data Center's Climate Services Division:

Climate Services Division
NOAA/National Climatic Data Center
151 Patton Avenue, Room 120
Asheville, NC 28801-5001
fax: 828-271-4876
phone: 828-271-4800
email: ncdc.orders@noaa.gov
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For questions about this report, please contact:

Mike Changery
NOAA/National Climatic Data Center
151 Patton Avenue
Asheville, NC 28801-5001
fax: 828-271-4328
email: mchangry@ncdc.noaa.gov

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